October 22, 2017

Happy Haiga Day!

Halloween is a week away. If you're looking for a simple costume, go as he-who-shall-not-be-named. A white shirt, a red tie, tan-in-a-tube, a little white make-up for around the eyes, and a yellow wig. Or, a rubber mask would do the trick. (There are some who'd advise against such a costume; read more here.)


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

costume shopping
yellow wigs and self-tanners
all sold out

October 20, 2017

Poetry Friday--I'm Back!

I wasn't going to post today, but Linda Baie's post kind of shamed me into it. Linda and I, Janet Fagal, Pamela Ross, Charles Waters, and about a dozen others, attended the 2017 Highlights "The Craft and Heart of Writing Poetry for Children," with Georgia Heard and Rebecca Kai Dotlich. Suffice it to say, it was wonderful and inspiring. However, it will take a bit of time to incorporate some of what I learned. In my case, it may take me off onto avenues I've not taken before--think rhyme, poetic devices, etc. Here's a senryu, featuring a leaf I took a picture of to demonstrate a species-identifying app on my phone! Not the prettiest leaf, but against the gray-brown of the woodland path it does stand out, and, it provided me with a apt metaphor!


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

finding colors
hidden under the green
...poetry workshop

If you haven't already, please visit A Day in the Life for the Poetry Friday Round-Up.



October 15, 2017

Happy Haiga Day!

A cherita for today. There will be no posts until next Sunday as I will be attending the Highlights "The Craft and Heart of Writing Poetry for Children 2017" workshop. If I had been on the ball, I would have prepared Tuesday's sticky and the Poetry Friday post ahead of time, but I'm not exactly well-balanced this week! See you next Sunday!


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:


as I fall asleep

a snippet of a jingle
long forgotten

a melody easy
to recall but the words
barely break through

October 13, 2017

Poetry Friday--I Can't Get No Satisfaction!

Last Friday's post was a poem titled, "Early October." I had written and illustrated it the weekend prior. By the time Friday came along, I had grown to dislike the poem. This seems to be a pattern with me of late.

Here is a short poem flower poem I made into a haiku sticky in late September:


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

Goldenrod, cinquefoil,
beggerticks, buttercups,
hawkweed, goatsbeard.
It's as if autumn seized
the summer sun to parcel
out to delirious bees.

Although I liked the poem, it didn't relay the sense of urgency I felt coming from the bees now that fall has arrived. So, I approached the topic of autumn again and recycled the delirious bees to come up with "Early October" for last Friday.

Here's the text:

Early October

An underlying hum
from the delirium
of a hundred honeybees.

A brief period when
golden light portends
chilly changes on the breeze.

White and muted pastel
wildflowers foretell
fashions for winter fairies.

Early ends to the days
find diligence gives way
to woollies, poems, and teas.


It struck me as less than satisfactory. I began to feel I had unnecessarily attached three stanzas to my bees stanza. So, on Sunday I reposted "Early October" as a one stanza mini-poem.


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved. If you have a full-size screen, click on the image to enlarge it and see how many bees you find.

Text:

Early October

An underlying hum
from the delirium
of a hundred honeybees.

Going back to the original "Early October" poem I found the last stanza was awkward and cliched. It had to go! But, I liked the idea of the third stanza with it's winter fairy fashions. I rewrote it as a cherita. [A cherita is an untitled poem of three stanzas. The first stanza is one line and sets a scene. The second stanza is two lines and the third stanza is three lines. The cherita tells a little story.]


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

October wildflowers

white and muted pastels
less garish than summer's blooms

their color palette
will be borrowed for winter's
fairy fashions

I was left with the second stanza. I didn't hate it, so I tried to rewrite it as a simple haiku. I got hung up on using metaphor. Haiku doesn't use simile and metaphor. If I wanted to use a poetic device, I could write it as a tanka:


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

shadows lengthen
while days grow short
October light
through its golden warp
are woven threads of silver

I ended up revisiting that last stanza, which I thought wasn't worth salvaging, but, you can always find a haiku if you look close enough.

October...
with my cup of tea
a poem

© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Thanks for reading this far. I think I'm finally finished! I hope you'll visit Live Your Poem where Irene is hosting the Poetry Friday Round-Up.




October 8, 2017

Happy Haiga Day!

An abbreviated version of the poem I posted on Friday!


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

Early October

An underlying hum
from the delirium
of a hundred honeybees.

October 6, 2017

Poetry Friday--"Early October"

September zipped by and it's October! Next thing we know, it will be January. I'm not being facetious. The last three months of the year always seems to be the most overscheduled of all. Next weekend I'm heading off to the Highlights workshop, "The Craft and Heart of Writing Poetry for Children." I've decided to take the plunge since I don't seem to be getting any younger!

I know several attendees from prior writing events and Poetry Friday. I'm looking forward to seeing Linda Baie, Janet Clare, and Pamela Ross. Anyone else from the Poetry Friday crew attending?

I don't mind saying, the prospect of attending as a poet, rather than as a librarian, or a general know-it-all, frightens me a bit. I'm always waiting for the little kid in the crowd who's going to yell out, "She's not wearing clothes!" Will that child suss me out in Honesdale?

My poem for today is a light-hearted approach to October, rather than my real feelings about the season. I wrote in rhyme, which, for me at least, drives me toward lightening up. I think it may work as a children's poem, but to tell the truth, most of what I write is for me (and P.F. visitors) and since I'm 7 1/2 going on 70, I'm not sure what age my poems are for!


Poem © Diane Mayr, all rights reserved. Painting by Ernest Parton, "A Field of Wildflowers"

Text:

Early October

An underlying hum
from the delirium
of a hundred honeybees.

A brief period when
golden light portends
chilly changes on the breeze.

White and muted pastel
wildflowers foretell
fashions for winter fairies.

Early ends to the days
find diligence gives way
to woollies, poems, and teas.


It seems like the autumn colors are a little late in coming to New Hampshire this year. The painting I chose generally reflects the color palette outside. Click on the image to enlarge it a bit--doesn't the patch of dark to the right of the tree trunk, look like a Father Time figure? Who is he walking with? (Or, if you prefer--"With whom is he walking?")

[It's been a week or so since I wrote it, and in reading the poem again, I'm sorry I didn't leave it as a short, short poem of just the first stanza. The other three stanzas are unnecessary padding. Come back on Sunday for the shortened version when I'll re-illustrate it for Happy Haiga Day!]

Visit Violet Nesdoly | Poems for the Poetry Friday Round-Up and go out and enjoy this early October weekend!